The Dagda and other Gods in carving

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Comyn
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The Dagda

Post by Comyn » Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:44 pm

I agree with Faellon that the Dagda tradition should be revived!
In fact I think we should carve an entire pantheon!
If anyone wants to have their own Dagda and isn't up to carving one, check this guy out:
http://studio-yarinka.com/product-categ ... ods/dagda/
dagda.jpg
The Dagda

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Faellon
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Re: The Dagda

Post by Faellon » Wed Nov 08, 2017 6:30 pm

Comyn wrote:
Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:44 pm
I agree with Faellon that the Dagda tradition should be revived!
In fact I think we should carve an entire pantheon!
If anyone wants to have their own Dagda and isn't up to carving one, check this guy out:
http://studio-yarinka.com/product-categ ... ods/dagda/

dagda.jpg
Those are seriously cool

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Aonghus
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Re: The Dagda

Post by Aonghus » Wed Nov 08, 2017 10:52 pm

Comyn wrote:
Tue Nov 07, 2017 7:44 pm
If anyone wants to have their own Dagda and isn't up to carving one, check this guy out:
http://studio-yarinka.com/product-categ ... ods/dagda/

dagda.jpg
As cool as that is, the style is inconsistent with examples from our time period:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boa_Island

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Comyn
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Boa Island carvings

Post by Comyn » Thu Nov 09, 2017 6:17 am

While I would agree that the style looks almost too modern, I don't think there's really any extant wooden carvings we can look to from our chosen period to compare them to. The Boa carvings are in stone for one thing so its probable that they would be less detailed due to the difficulty in working that medium. Secondly, their similarity to the carvings of White Island suggest that the Boa carvings are most likely early Christian carvings in that style. Certainly good for our period, but not as wholly pagan as some might think in my opinion.

That said, I really dig them and started to carve a copy of one of the Boa heads in soapstone which you've now reminded me I should get back to.

I would encourage everyone to think about carving some totems in the spirit of the Dagda that Aonghus made. Some good subjects might be: Brigit for Imbolc, or Lugh for Pennsic (Lughnassad), or Bel for Beltaine. The Celtic pantheon was just that. There are Gods and spirits a-plenty in the tales to choose from and each served a particular need.

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Aonghus
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The Dagda and other Gods in carving

Post by Aonghus » Thu Nov 09, 2017 9:38 am

Christians and Pagans of our time period would have the same tools and the art is stylistically the same.

Pagan imagery is common on Christian churches (Sheela na gig anyone?) So even thematically there is enough crossover to be comfortable to cite Boa island. I would refer to to the stone Lugh statue on the cover of a book you read as an alternate example, which is assuredly not Christian thematically.

Objects are hard to find on Google because any search is going to be flooded with modern items and anything that gets tagged celtic. Books are better resources, but, less convenient obviously.

With Ireland's boggy nature and woodperserving properties, coupled with the Celtic penchant for votive deposits, there are examples of wood and bone carvings that would be consistent with the "crudeness" of the boa island figures, even if slightly better detailed. Also note that castings using lost wax method (wax being easy to carve) also show the same "crudeness

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Comyn
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Re: The Dagda and other Gods in carving

Post by Comyn » Thu Nov 09, 2017 10:00 am

note: I've split these posts off to a new thread in the public forums.

You reminded me that that book should be added to the Library. I meant to do it, but never got to it. Maybe you could write something up?

I'd be interested in seeing some surviving wood carvings from our period if you can scan 'em in or point me to them.

I recently posted about the Sheela na gigs quoting an article I read in the Irish Times which makes a strong case that they seem to be associated with churches from the 12th to 14th century and could certainly have been older and incorporated into those churches, but just as easily NOT be old and just be a way that the church was reaching out to a population of folks who were still celebrating folk traditions.

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Comyn
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Re: The Dagda and other Gods in carving

Post by Comyn » Thu Nov 09, 2017 12:25 pm

The Dagda at Pennsic 37
Sabha had purchased a bunch of different incense up top and the Dagda was kept in constant supply that year.
IMG_4033.JPG
Photo by Comyn

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Aonghus
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Re: The Dagda and other Gods in carving

Post by Aonghus » Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:37 pm

here is a bit more on style...

https://www.museum.ie/The-Collections/D ... m-The-Past


Note in the Irish sagas, they often refer to an idealized head as "broad above and narrow below".

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Aonghus
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Re: The Dagda and other Gods in carving

Post by Aonghus » Thu Nov 09, 2017 3:54 pm

Prior to our time period but still relevant as far as the grotesque style is concerned.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ralaghan_Man

And then for 25 bucks you can read this article... saldy it only covers up to 350 BC but I wood (ha!) assume it's informative

https://www.cambridge.org/core/journals ... D3E5C49E4B

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